About this Show

Public Affairs

News News/Business.

NETWORK

DURATION
03:00:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel 91 (627 MHz)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
704

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Hawaii 48, Inouye 41, Massachusetts 35, Mrs. Maloney 29, Us 26, California 24, Florida 23, John Olver 22, New York 21, Barney 20, Mr. Markey 16, Washington 16, Mr. Miller 14, Arkansas 14, South Carolina 13, America 12, U.s. 11, Mr. Michaud 10, Maine 9, John 9,
Borrow a DVD
of this show
  CSPAN    Public Affairs    News  News/Business.  

    December 19, 2012
    5:00 - 8:00pm EST  

5:00pm
5:01pm
5:02pm
5:03pm
the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 330, the nays are 177. the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the the gentleman from from texas to suspend the rules and pass s. 3564 in which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 3564, suspend the declassification act until 2014 and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rule and pass the bill. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a
5:04pm
five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
5:05pm
5:06pm
5:07pm
5:08pm
5:09pm
the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 409. the nays are one. 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the unfinished business is the vote on the motionful the gentleman from texas, mr. farenthold, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6016, as
5:10pm
amended, on which the yeas and nays were ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6016, a bill to amend title 5, united states code, to provide for administrative leave requirements with respect to senior executive service employees, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill as amended. members will record their votes by electronic device. this will be a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
5:11pm
5:12pm
5:13pm
5:14pm
5:15pm
5:16pm
the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 400 --
5:17pm
the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 402, the nays are 2. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. without objection, the title is amended.
5:18pm
the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the house will be in order. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. members, please remove your conversations from the floor. pursuant to clause 8, rule 20, the chair will further postponeproceedings on additional motions to suspend the rules or which the yeas and nays are recorded or there is objection. any record votes on postponed questions will be taken later.
5:19pm
the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? >> i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 3137 to name the medical center in spokane, washington, as the mann-grandstaff medical center. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. >> a bill to name the department of veterans affairs medical center in spokane, washington, as the mann-grandstaff department of veterans affairs medical center. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from florida, mr. miller, the gentleman from maine, mr. michaud, each will control 20 minutes. members, please remove conversations from the floor. members in the aisle.
5:20pm
mr. miller: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for such time as he may consume. mr. miller: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 3197 would rename the medical center in spokane, the mann-grandstaff department of veterans affairs medical center. this legislation would recognize not one, but two -- the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: members, please remove conversations from the floor. remove conversations from the floor. the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: this legislation
5:21pm
would recognize not one, but two american heroes, both medal of honor recipients. private first class joeman and platoon sergeant bruce alan grand staff, their story is nothing less than heroic. i would like to yield at this time, the sponsor of this particular legislation, the chair woman of the republican conference, the gentlelady from washington to tell you the story. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for such time as she may consume. mrs. mcmorris rodgers: thank you, mr. chairman. i rise today in strong support of h.r. 3197, naming the veterans affairs medical center in spokane, washington, after two of our local eastern washington heroes. the mann-grandstaff medical center. private first class joe e. mann and platoon sergeant grandstaff
5:22pm
are heroes from eastern washington who gave their last full measure of devotion to our nation. both men have been awarded the medal of honor for their bravery in world war ii and vietnam respectfully. after graduating from high school in rear don, washington, private first class joe e. mann joined the army and trained at forth lewis. p.f.c.man was on the front lines where his platoon was surrounded and in the face of heavy fire, p.f.c. mann destroyed an ammunition dump and took out flume rouse enemy troops. despite being wounded four times, p.f.c. mann refused to be evacuated and remained with his
5:23pm
platoon and stood guard that evening. the following morning, the enemy attacked throwing hand grenades as they approached. a grenade landed within a few feet of p.f.c. mann. unable to raise his ban acknowledged arms, he yelled -- bandaged arms, he yelled grenade. saving his fellow soldiers, he died moments after the explosion. for his act, he was awarded the congressional medal of honor. born and raised in spokane, washington, platoon sergeant bruce a. grandstaff graduated in 1952 and enlisted in the army a few years later. 1966, he volunteered for duty in vietnam. on may 18, 1967, platoon sergeant grandstaff was leading a weapons platoon when it came
5:24pm
under attack. despite taking heavy fire from three directions, he raced into the intense fire to aid his men. surrounded by 700 enemy troops during a five-hour siege and being wounded in both legs, platoon sergeant grandstaff continued to fight and encourage his men while his position was being overrun. he asked for artillery fire on his exact location knowing full will, it would result in his death. his heroic actions that day immediately saved at least eight of his brothers and alerting them of the enemy's bunkered location. at the time of his death, he had already been awarded the silver star for courage and for his gal and try that day in may, platoon
5:25pm
sergeant grandstaff was awarded the congressional medal of honor. they are both heroes willing to sacrifice their own lives to protect their fellow soldiers. their selfless advancement of freedom, liberty, justice and democracy is truly humbling and i'm honored to represent the legacy both men left behind for eastern washington and our nation. mr. speaker, i urge all of my colleagues to join in honoring these two eastern washington heroes, private first class joe e. mann and platoon sergeant bruce a. grandstaff and support h.r. 3197. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maine. mr. michaud: i rise today to offer my support for h.r. 3197 a bill to name the department of veterans affairs in spokane, washington as the
5:26pm
mann-grandstaff medical center. private first class joe mann served with the first 101 airborne division in world war ii and lost his life absorbing a blast with a hand grenade with his body to protect those around him. later in 1954, private first class mann received the medal of honor. platoon sergeant grandstaff received the medal of honor after his death. surrounded by the enany near cambodia and crawled through the front lines to save his brothers. despite his wounds he was able to notify the u.s. helicopters of their location and called for artillery in order to prevent the enemy from advancing. private first class mann and sergeant grandstaff made the ultimate stack cry files for our nation.
5:27pm
it is most appropriate that the v.a. medical center in spokane be renamed in honor of these two heroes and i urge my colleagues to support this piece of legislation. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: we have no further requests for time at this moment. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maine. mr. michaud: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: i thank the sponsor of this legislation. she is the wife of a navy retired commander and is a strong advocate for veterans in washington and around this country and thanks to my good friend, the new ranking member mike michaud in helping to move this legislation to the floor. he has been an active and valuable member of our committee since his first days in congress and he himself has proven himself time and time again a strong voice for americans' veterans. i urge all of my colleagues to
5:28pm
join me in supporting h.r. 3197. before i ask -- giving away the balance of my time. i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend all remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. miller: i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 3197. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended -- the gentleman from maine. mr. michaud: i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? mr. miller: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6443 to designate the facility of the department of veterans affairs located at 9800 west boulevard in sunrise
5:29pm
boulevard the william kling clinic. the clerk: h.r. 6443, a bill to designate the facility of the department of veterans affairs located at 9800 west commercial boulevard in sunrise boulevard as the william kling florida -- clinic. mr. miller: i yield myself as much time as i might consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. miller: the legislation before us would name the v.a. community-based outpatient clinic in sunrise the william bill kling v.a. clinic. william better known as bill, served as a navy radar technician during the second world war. when he moved to plantation in 1973, he continued his service this time as an advocate for his fellow veterans and spent eight years as florida's commissioner
5:30pm
of veterans affairs and 27 years as the president of a broward council on veterans. mr. speaker, at this time, i have no further speakers. but i do want to recognize or i guess reserve the balance of my time so mr. michaud can recognize the sponsor of the legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from maine. mr. michaud: thank you, mr. speaker. i would like to yield to the gentlewoman from florida, ms. wasserman schultz, the time she needs to explain her bill the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. ms. wasserman schultz: i rise in support of the bill, a health clinic in the city of sunrise, florida, as the william "bill" kling v.a.
5:31pm
clinic. william passed away sadly on august 6 at age 84. my deepest appreciation goes out to the committee on veterans' affairs and chairman miller who is a great friend from the state of florida, for supporting this effort and helping it to come to the floor. bill was a member of our greatest generation of americans, serving our nation in the navy during world war ii. but this was far from over when he returned from war. in fact, it was just beginning. bill claims -- became our strongest advocate and helping generations of veterans as they returned to civilian life. he worked tirelessly to make sure our veterans were getting the benefits they deserved, from education to quality health care through our v.a. system. i'm sure our florida colleagues will tell you that bill was a force to be reckoned with, pushing the urgency of the
5:32pm
issue at hand. i know he will be sorely missed. in particular, my thoughts and prayers goes out to bill's family, including his daughter. i had the distinct pleasure, mr. speaker, for working with bill for the past 23 years and witnessed firsthand the many ways he helped thousands of veterans in florida. i'm also proud to have called him my friend. for the past seven years, bill served as the chair of my military academy nominations board where he helped the next generation of military leaders realize their dream of serving the country they love. for eight years he served on the florida commission on veterans affairs and for the past 27 years, as you've heard, he was the florida of the broward county veterans council. he also led the jewish war veterans and was a member of the americans legion, the disabled american veterans. the list of superlatives is long and shows him the great american he was. he was elected into the broward
5:33pm
hall of famer, changed the scope of veterans in the state of florida. he helped bring the nursing home to pembroke pines in 2001 and worked with veterans to create the national cemetery in palm beach in 2007. one of bill's greatish accomplishments was ensuring veterans would have easy access to quality medical care. bill noticed that too often veterans in broward county had to travel too far to get to a v.a. facility to get the care they needed. with that in mind he helped open the oakland park v.a. outpatient clinic more than two decades ago. when building the clinic began deteriorating, he built a brand new facility. bill kept a smile on his face and kept working to overcome every obstacle because that's how bill kling operated. in 2008, a new 98,000 square foot colin ib opened in sunrise and on his birthday. without bill kling this
5:34pm
wonderful center might not exist. with that in mind, congressman ted deutch and i offer this legislation today which will rename the broward outpatient clinic as the william "bill" kling clinic. every veteran that walks through the doors of the v.a. clinic will know the name of the man who did so much for so many. mr. speaker, i urge my colleagues to support passage of this legislation so we pay tribute to a great american, william "bill" kling. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: i want to thank my friend for bringing this legislation to the floor and honoring such a fine gentleman. i also again want to thank the ranking member for helping us work so quickly to bring this legislation to the floor and i would also and note that in closing an acisment by c.b.o. represents minimal cost to the federal government. and with that i reserve the
5:35pm
balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maine. mr. michaud: thank you, mr. speaker. i now yield three minutes to the gentleman from florida, mr. deutch. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida is recognized for three minutes. deutch deutch thank you, mr. speaker. -- mr. deutch: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman from maine. i rise today and urge unanimous support for h.r. 6443, to designate the department of veterans affairs facility in sunrise to bill kling v.a. clinic. naming this clinic after bill kling is more than a way to honor the memory of a great man. it's a most fitting way to acknowledge one of bill's greatest accomplishments. as a tireless advocate for south florida's veterans. because of bill kling, florida's veterans are better cared for. year after year, he fought for the benefit for the veterans so rightfully earned during their service, including education under the g.i. bill and health care through the v.a. his achievements were many, but
5:36pm
as the opening of the clinic in sunrise, bill was the most proud of. he had previously assisted with the establishment of a clinic in oakland park. as the facility was no longer suitable to care for the veterans, he started out a 13-year project of establishing a new facility. and after years of obstacles, the clinic opened in 2008 on his birthday and he commented at the time that the fight was not for building. the fight was for better health care for our veterans. now, thanks to bill kling and thanks to his vision, veterans in south florida have a local v.a. health care facility available to them. the veterans from the west side of the county are able to receive medical assistance without the burden of having to travel long distances. i urge my colleagues to join me in renaming this clinic in his honor. every veteran cared for in this clinic is part of bill's lasting legacy. i'm humbled to remember him
5:37pm
today, not just as a community leader, but as a friend. i commend congresswoman wasserman schultz, my good friend and colleague, for her introduction of this bill and her comments honoring the memory of mr. kling. he truly was a caring, a compassionate and a loyal person and a loyal friend that made everyone who crossed his path feel as though they were the most special person he knew. finally, mr. speaker, when we announced that legislation to rename this facility at the facility, there was some veterans standing out in front waiting to go in. and they asked what the hubbub was about. they asked why all the tv cameras and i explained to them who bill kling was and why this was being done. they were grateful to know and veterans just like those veterans when they walk through the front door, will not only learn about bill kling but his example for continuing to work hard every single day for his
5:38pm
fellow veterans. what a great honor we're bestoge on his family and by -- destowing on his family. -- bestowing on his family. i ask my colleagues to support this bill honoring this great american. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: i have no further speakers. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maine. mr. michaud: i have no further speakers. i encourage my colleagues to support h.r. 6443. before yielding back my time i'd like to thank chairman miller and your entire staff for working with the minority staff to bring these two bills before the house. but also want to thank you for your friendship and guidance over the years, as we both served on the veterans' affairs committee. i look forward to my new role as the ranking member of the veterans' affairs committee and look forward to working with you and your staff as well. i want to thank you for your strong advocacy for our veteran. and that's one of the reasons why i think we work very well together is we have a common
5:39pm
goal, a common purpose to help our veterans and their families out. so i want to thank you, look forward to working with you in the upcoming congress as well as the remainder of this congress. so with that, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: mr. speaker, i also ask unanimous consent that all all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and add any extraneous material for h.r. 6443. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. miller: thanks, once again. i appreciate the kind remarks by my good friend, the ranking member of the veterans' affairs committee. once again encourage all my members to support this legislation and yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 6443. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative -- mr. michaud: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from maine. mr. michaud: mr. speaker, i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and i make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this motion will be postponed.
5:40pm
the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today it adjourn to meet at noon tomorrow. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered.
5:41pm
>> mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 60 -- 6379. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6379, a bill to designate the facility of the
5:42pm
united states postal service located at 6239 savannah highway in ravenel, south carolina, as the representative curtis b. inabinett sr. post office. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. farenthold, and the gentlewoman from new york, mrs. maloney, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r. 6379. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized, and without objection. mr. farenthold: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 6379, introduced by the gentleman from south carolina, mr. clyburn, would designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 6239 savannah highway in ravenel, south carolina, as the representative curtis b. inabinett sr. post office. this bill was introduced on
5:43pm
september 12. mr. speaker, mr. inabinett is a longstanding and faithful citizen of south carolina. he was born there in 1931 and attended grade school, college and graduate school in the state. later, he taught at baptist high school in charleston county and was appointed to the charleston county election commission. he became the medicare of ravenel, south carolina, and joined the south carolina house of representatives where he served until 2001. mr. speaker, representative inabinett is a worthy designee of this postal facility naming, and i urge all members to join me in support of this bill. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from new york. mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, as a member of the committee on oversight and government reform, i am pleased to join my colleagues in a bipartisan way
5:44pm
in the consideration of h.r. 6379, to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 6239 savannah, highway, in ravenel, south carolina, as the representative curtis b. inabinett sr. post office. i am pleased to yield five minutes to the distinguished assistant democratic leader, congressman clyburn, from the great state of south carolina for as much time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for five minutes. mr. clyburn: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i thank the gentlelady from new york for yielding me the time. mr. speaker, i rise today in support of h.r. 6379, naming the post office in ravenel, south carolina, after representative curtis b.
5:45pm
inabinett sr. i want to thank my colleagues in the south carolina congressional delegation for their support of this bill. curtis inabinett was born in islington, south carolina, and when curtis was 11, his father passed away leaving curtis as the oldest of 11 siblings to shoulder the responsibility of helping to manage the family farm and look after his younger brothers and sisters. . he attended south carolina state college and after several years in the army, he became a teacher at baptist highly high school in charleston, south carolina, where he taught for 13 years. he then became the principal of
5:46pm
a middle school. a position he held until his retirement in 1989. his commitment to public service went beyond his passion for education. he and i got started in politics around the same time when he was appointed as the first african american on the charleston county election commission. later, curtis would win his seat on the ravenel town council. and in 1982, became the first african-american mayor of ravenel. in 1991, curtis was elected to the south carolina house of representatives. he retired from the house in 2000. following the 2001 settlement of a redistricting lawsuit, curtis became one of three african americans who won seats on the
5:47pm
charleston county council where he served until 2011. throughout his tenure, representing his hometown of ravenel as the mayor, its representative or on county council, curtis has been a fierce advocate for the needs of his community. he has broken down barriers throughout his life and i'm sure the town of ravenel will be proud to be the home of the representative curtis b. inbin et senior post office. and with that, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. farenthold: i have no further speakers and continue to reserve. mrs. maloney: having no other speakers, i yield back the
5:48pm
balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. as mr. clyburn has said, this is a fine gentleman, well deserving of having this post alpha silt named after him and i urge members to support passage of h.r. 637 and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 6379. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. mrs. maloney: i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the gentlelady from new york.
5:49pm
mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady make a point of order? mrs. maloney: i object on the ground that the quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8, rule 20, further proceedings on this motion will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. farenthold: mr. speaker, i move the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 3869. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3869, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 600 east capitol avenue in little rock, arkansas as the sidney sid sanders mcmath post office building. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. fearn
5:50pm
hold, and the gentlewoman from new york, mrs. maloney, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days with which to revise and extend their remarks and add extraneous material to the bill under consideration h.r. 3869. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. farenthold: mr. speaker, h.r. 3869 introduced by the gentleman from arkansas, mr. griffin, would designate the fa sit of the united states postal service located at 600 east capitol avenue in little rock, arkansas as the sidney sid sanders mcmath post office building. the bill was introduced on february 1 and reported from the government oversight and reform committee. sid mcmath was a prosecuting
5:51pm
attorney, decorated marine officer and governor of the state of arkansas. he received the silver star for his heroic leadership during world war ii. as governor, mcmath championed several infrastructure improvements to benefit his state, the paving of primary roads. mcmath died in his home in little rock, arkansas on saturday, october 4, 2003. he has given a full military funeral by the u.s. marine corps honor guard. mr. mcmathis a worthy designee of this post office naming facility and i urge members to support this bill and i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlelady from new york is recognized. mrs. maloney: i yield myself such time as i may consume the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. maloney: as a member of the
5:52pm
house committee on oversight and government reform, i'm pleased to join my colleagues in the consideration of h.r. 3869, to designate the facility of the u.s. postal service located at 600 east k308 avenue in little rock arkansas as the sidney sid sancheders mcmath post office building. the bill before us was introduced by jim griffin on february 1, 012. in accordance with committee requirements. it is co-sponsored by all members of the arkansas delegation and was reported out of the oversight committee by unanimous consent on june 27th, 2012. as a former two-term governor for arkansas, sid nip sanders mcmath started his career as an enlisted officer with the u.s. marine corps. having fought in the battle for
5:53pm
the solomon islands in world war ii, mr. mcmath would earn the rank of lieutenant colonel for his courageous efforts in the war. when he refired from the u.s. marine corps he was lieutenant general. he would return to his hometown of hot springs earning a reputation as a reformer, he worked to rid the local government of corruption. his noble actions and hard work would carry him to victory in the 1948 election to become governor of arkansas. leading the way as a reformist in all manners, he fought for civil rights for african americans and modernized the arkansas transportation infrastructure. his hard work and determination has cemented his legacy in arkansas' history. to commemorate sidney mcmath, i
5:54pm
ask that we pass the measure before us and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? mr. farenthold: thank you very much plrks chairman. i would like to yield as much time as he may consume, the gentleman from arkansas. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. griffin: this bill would designate the facility of the united states post office located at 600 east capitol avenue in little rock as the sidney sid sanders mcmath post office building. he was one of arkansas' finest sons and he served arkansas and our country. 34th governor of arkansas and received a silver star during the battle of peter thorpes.
5:55pm
he was born in arkansas on june 4, 1912. in high school, he was a skilled boxer and wonder the state golden gloves title. he waited on tables, washed dishes and fighting in exhibition boxing matches. after college, he served as a marine during world war ii where he distinguished himself in combat and earned the silver star and legion of merit. in 1948, he was elected as the 34th governor of arkansas serving from 1949 to 1953. he was an advocate of civil rights and working to abolish the poll tax. after serving as governor, he continued as a member of the marine corps reserve rising to the rank of major general. he founded the marine corps junior r.o.t.c. at catholic high
5:56pm
school for boys in little rock. many of the kids known as kid's kids have followed his example by serving their country. he passed away at the age of 93 in little rock. he was awarded the arkansas historical association's highest accolade, the -- and today we honor his dedication to his state and nation by installing a permanent marker to arkansas and america. his example is one that we can admire and i urge my colleagues to join me to honor his legacy, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from arkansas yields back. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from new york. mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, having no other speakers, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields.
5:57pm
the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i join with representative griffin in urging all of our members to support the naming of the sidney sanders mcmath post office building and urge support of this bill and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 3869. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the gentlelady from new york. mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20,
5:58pm
further proceedings on this motion will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? mr. farenthold: i move that the house suspend the ruse and pass h.r. 3378. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the bill -- the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 3378, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 220 elm avenue in munising, michigan as the elizabeth kinnunen post office building. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rules the gentleman from texas and golf new york each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: i yield myself such time as i may consume and ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and add
5:59pm
extraneous material to the record regarding h.r. 3378. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized. mr. farenthold: thank you very much, mr. speaker. h.r. 3378 introduced by the gentleman from michigan, mr. been she can would dedicate the postal service buildings as the elizabeth l. kinnunen post office building. this was reported from the government oversight and reform committee on february 7, 2012. she was a strong pillar of her community. she and her husband operated a boarding house and together they raised 11 children. two of their sons fought bravely for their country and tragically gave their lives. one of her sons was killed in action during world war ii. her son raymond was killed during the korean war. mr. speaker, mrs. kinnunen is a
6:00pm
worth designee of this postal naming and i urge all members to support me in this bill. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentlelady from new york is recognized. mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. maloney: as a member of the government oversight and government reform, i'm pleased to join my colleagues in the consideration of h.r. 3378 to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 220 elm avenue in munising, michigan as the elizabeth kinnunen post office building. the bill before us was introduced by my colleague, dan been she can, on november 4, 2011. in accordance with committee
6:01pm
refirmentse, h.r. 3378 is co-sponsored by all members of the michigan delegation and was reported out of the oversight committee by a voice vote on february 7, 2012. . she has a special place in our heart for her sacrifice to the community. she is a double gold star mother, her son beso was killed in the battle of the bulge. unfortunately, years later, her son raymond was killed in the korean war while a third son served in west germany in the same war. no mother should have to lose two sons to war. but her family's sacrifice will forever be part of history and i ask that we pass this bill with no reservation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is
6:02pm
recognized. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i yield such time as he may consume to my distinguished colleague from the state of michigan, mr. benishek. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize. mr. benishek: i come to the floor today to urge my colleagues to support my legislation, h.r. 4378, a bill to name the post office building in munising, michigan, after the late mrs. elizabeth kinnunen. her story is that like many across this nation, she came to america as an immigrant to to have a better life. she came to the united states in 1903 and married oscar in 1909. they had seven children and worked hard all their life to ensure their children would have a shot at the american
6:03pm
dream. they operated a boarding house in michigan, providing warm beds to many timber and mining workers in mar keth county. eventually they moved to munising, where he worked for the paper company and she worked as a local cook. she was a faithful member of the lutheran church there. her life was marked with tragedy, two of her sworns killed in war while defending the freedoms we cherish so much. one was killed in action in the battle of the bulk in 1945 and raymond lost his life in the korean war in 1952. we will never know the grief their family must have suffered after such an enormous life and we nil never fathom the somber dignity she must have felt to, in the words of president
6:04pm
lincoln, to have laid so high a cost on the altar of freedom. she died in 1974 at the age of 81. she is not famous. her name does not grace history books, but her life, the family she raised, the terrible sacrifices she endured, a small but important part of the long story we call the united states. it is lives like hers that made this country the greatest nation in the world. naming this post office in her honor is a thoughtful and lasting way for the community to celebrate her life and accomplishments. i urge my colleagues to support this legislation and i yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan yields back the balance of his type. the gentlelady from new york is recognized. mrs. maloney: having no further speakers, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york yields back the balance of her thisme gentleman from texas is recognized.
6:05pm
mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i urge all members to support the passage of h.r. 4378 and yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4378? those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended and the bill is passed and without objection the motion to to reconsider is laid on the table. mrs. maloney: i object. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from new york rise? mrs. maloney: i object@vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceed option the motion -- on this motion will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. farenthold: i move the house suspend the rules and
6:06pm
pass h.r. 4389. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 4389, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 19 east merced street in fowler, california thearks cecil e. bolt post office. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. farenthold, and the gentlelady from new york, mrs. maloney each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: i yield myself such time as i may consume and ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days with which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized. mr. farenthold: mr. speaker, h.r. 4389 introduced by the gentleman from california, mr. costa, would designate the facile i have to the united states postal service, located
6:07pm
at 19 east merced street in fowler, california a this has the cecil e. bolt post office this bill was introduced on april 18 and prereported favorably from the committee on government oversight and reform on june 7. cecil bolt was drafted into the army prior to the start of world war ii. he was assigned to the allusion islands in -- to the aleutian islands in alaska. he was appointed post mast her -- postmaster in 1947, he's known for friendly service, including delivering packagesen christmas eve. sadly he pass aid way on february 9, 2007. nonetheless, he is fondly remembered by many family members and friends. mr. speaker, mr. bolt is a worthy designee of this postal facility naming and i urge all members to join me in support of this bill and reserve the
6:08pm
balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from new york, mrs. maloney. mrs. maloney: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentlelady is recognize. mrs. maloney: as a member of the house committee on oversight and government reform i'm pleased to join my colleagues in the consideration of h.r. 4389 which was introduced by my good friend and colleague representative jim costa from the great state of california. i now yield him as much time as he may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. costa: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in support of h.r. 4389 and thank the gentlelady from new york for yielding me the time to speak on behalf of the naming of this post office in fowler, california, on behalf of cecil e. bolt who was the postmaster there for many, many years. today is a great day for -- for
6:09pm
the city of fowler and for its community and the city council who over a year ago overwhelmingly came to me and asked that we dedicate the name appropriately so the post office at fowler, california, on behalf of the postmaster who served the city and the community so well for so many years. fowler is a wonderful community in -- community in my district of over 5,000 people that could be of many communities that we have throughout the country work a high school, with generations of families that have lived there for years. as a matter of fact, one of our colleagues, congresswoman jackie speier's mother was born in fowler, california. we today name the post office after cecil e. bolt. he was born an raised in idaho but like many came to california. after graduating from college,
6:10pm
mr. bolt moved to fowler in 1939. just prior to world war ii, he was drafted into the u.s. army and was -- and as was noted was assigned to the 75th ar tillly unit in alaska. he was part of, as tom brokaw wrote, america's greatest generation. 1942, he married the love of his life, nay oh moo opal gorley and they raised two loving daughters, dorothy and kathy jean. bolt, after the war, returned to fowler and was appointed post-master a position he held for 27 years. known for his dedication and friendly demeanor, as many times he would personally deliver packages, not just during the christmas season but throughout the year because of course everybody knew cecil. his decades of public service extended far beyond the walls of the post office which centered as a hub of activity for the community.
6:11pm
cecil volunteered every day for more than 17 years at the marshall elementary school where hi -- his service helped shape a generation of young people. he was also a faithful and active member of the presbyterian church of fowler where he served as a sunday schoolteacher and kids club volunteer. for his service, he received the citizen of the year award in 1969 and the silent servant of the year award in 2004. sadly after years and years of service, see sail -- cecil bolt passed away in 2007. those in the city of fowl whore knew him were undoubtedly better off thanks to the good various of post-master bolt. so in conclusion, mr. speaker. the city of fowler and its city council and overwhelming citizen -- support of citizen they was city and students who wrote in post-cards asking that
6:12pm
we do this in his honor, without reservation, recognize the post office in the city of fowler to be named after post-master cecil e. bolt in ted case to his family and the community of fowler as well as the united states postal service. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back and the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: having no other speaker at this time, i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas re-- from texas reserves. the gentlelady from new york is recognized. mrs. maloney: having no further speakers, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting h.r. 4389, the cecil e. bolt post office, i urge all members to join me in support of this bill and yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas yields
6:13pm
back. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 4389? those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative -- the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the gentlelady from new york is recognized. mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, i object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20 further proceedings on this motion will be postponed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? mr. farenthold: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 6260. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6260, a bill to designate the facile -- facility of the united states
6:14pm
postal service located at 211 hope street in mountain view, california thearks lieutenant kenneth m. ballard memorial post office. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from texas, mr. farenthold, and the gentlelady from new york, mrs. maloney, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume and request unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and submit extraneous material for inclusion in the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. the gentleman is recognized. mr. farenthold: mr. speaker, h.r. 6260 introduced by the gentlelady from california, ms. eshoo, would designate the facile tiff of the united states postal service located at 211 hope street, mountain view, california, as the lieutenant kenneth m. ballard memorial post office.
6:15pm
this bill was reported on august 1 and reportedly favorably from the oversight and government reform committee. lieutenant ballard devoted his entire adult life to serving our country. on garage waiting from mountain view high school in 1995, he went into the armed forces. sadly he was killed in 2004 while deployed in iraq. i'm truly grateful for the brave and heroic service of lieutenant ballard and for all of those who serve and defend our nation every day. mr. speaker, lieutenant ballard is well worthy as a designee of the postal facility naming and i urge all members to join me in support of this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the chair recognizes the gentlelady from new york, mrs. maloney. mrs. maloney: i yield myself such time as i may consume. mr. speaker, as a member of the house committee on oversight and government reform, i am
6:16pm
pleased to join my colleagues in support of h.r. 6260, a bill to designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 211 hope street, mountain view, california, as the lieutenant kenneth m. ballard memorial post office. . the bill was introduced by anna esh on from the -- eshoo from the great state of california. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. eshoo: i thank my colleague and good friend and classmate, mrs. maloney from new york, and colleague from the committee and thank you for your very kind and generous remarks about the designation of the united states post office in mountain view, california, in my district, as
6:17pm
the lieutenant kenneth m. ballard memorial post office. mountain view native, ken ballard joined the army at the age of 18. he comes from a distinguished family that have given a long line of service, of military service to our country and he attended basic training at forth knox, kentucky and served our nation in germany, bosnia and issuing. on april 3, 2004, his batallion, the second battalion, first armored division turned in their weapons and began preparing to return home. the very next day, violence broke out in baghdad, and shortly thereafter, lieutenant ballard's tour was unexpectedly extended for an additional 120 days. less than two months later on
6:18pm
may 20, 2004, after nine years of service, lieutenant ballard was killed in iraq by accidental discharge of the m-240 weapon on his vehicle. he was a recipient of the purple heart and three bronze stars, two with valor device. lieutenant ballard was a true american hero and his ultimate sacrifice deserves our formal recognition of gratitude, which is what we are doing here today. in paying tribute to him and his service, the house will not only honor his sacrifice but also that of every brave american who dons the uniform in defense of our nation each and every day. so many have given their lives so we may live ours freely and each deserves our gratitude, our respect and our remembrance. i want to thank the city council
6:19pm
of mountain view for their support of this effort and i want to pay tribute to lieutenant ballard's mother, karen meredith for her advocacy on behalf of her son, that the truth would be documented and put forward and of course her support in the renaming of the post office of his hometown after him. so i urge my colleagues to vote for this legislation. i thank everyone on a bipartisan basis that has been involved in this. and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. farenthold: i continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas reserves. the gentlelady from new york. mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, i join my colleague and compliment her in her very moving tribute not only to her constituent but to all the great men and women that serve our nation. i thank my colleagues on both
6:20pm
sides of the aisle for their support of this renaming and honoring a true american hero and noting that i have no additional speakers, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york yields back. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. i join the gentlelady from california and the gentlelady from new york in support of this legislation honoring lieutenant kenneth m. ballard in naming the post office and urge my colleagues to support h.r. 6260 and yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill h.r. 6260. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 being in the affirmative -- the gentlelady from new york is reckniced. mrs. maloney: mr. speaker, i
6:21pm
object to the vote on the grounds that a quorum is not present and make a point of order that a quorum is not present. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on the motion will be postponed.
6:22pm
the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does gentlelady from hawaii seek to be recognized. >> i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: resolved that the house of representatives, one, received with profound sorrow the news of the death of senator inouye, a senator from the state of hawaii. two, authorizes the speaker to appoint such members as he may designate to serve to represent the house in attendance at the funeral of the senator. three, directs the clerk to communicate this resolution to the senate and transmit a copy to the families of the senator
6:23pm
and four, when it adjourns today, does so as a further mark of respect to the memory of the senator. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from hawaii is recognized for one hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. earlier this week, my state of hawaii and our nation lost a truly great man, senator daniel k. inouye and began serving our country when he was 17 years old joining the army after the attack on pearl harbor. at that time, people questioned people who looked like him and that is why he joined the service. he was a true patriot. he loved his country and was willing to do whatever he could to defend it. in fact, he lost his arm charging a series of machine guns on a hill in italy on april 21, 1945.
6:24pm
his actions rightly earned him the medal of honor. he was the embodyment of the greatest generation, courage, sacrifice, humility and love of country. this was a commitment to serve and protect those who fight for our country is one he took personally. why he always stood up for the ideals of freedom and justice that our country is founded upon because he saw firsthand what happens when we don't and it's why he was always proud to stand up for our heritage in hawaii. the truth is, senator inouye deeply loved our beautiful state of hawaii. half a september try ago, he had a vision of the hawaii we inherit from him today. he displayed a builder's skill, pouring the foundation of the modern and vibrant hawaii that is his legacy. and so the greatest tribute we
6:25pm
can pay him is to acquire his vision, apply his skills and build on the remarkable foundation he laid for us. from strengthening our schools and university to building our roads and bridges and just today, our state marked another milestone led by senator inouye. we signed a full funding grant agreement with the u.s. government for our ohau rail project. this was a project championed by senator inouye for many years. the senator saw the future of hawaii often before others did and when he saw something that was going to better the lives of the people of hawaii, he always fought for it. this is probably one of the things he will be remembered for the most, his tenacity in fighting for the people of hawaii and for doing what is right. and while he may have been a fierce competitor, he was always
6:26pm
a gentle spirit. in in a washington that is so attorney apart, danny inouye diffused the situation and brought us together. he understood that words mattered as much as actions, and he always worked to elevate the debate and stood by his friends no matter their political stripes. it's why we have heard from people on both sides of the aisle and some who are speaking today who are saddened by his death. what our country lost this week, i received a message from our good friend and brother, faleomavaega and he is traveling overseas and asked that i mention his deep condolences to the people of hawaii. and i ask unanimous consent to incorporate into the record a statement that we have received
6:27pm
from congressman fall yeoh ma vega. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. hirono: they call senator inouye a mentor. simply put, senator inouye was an extraordinary person, a giant in the senate who accomplished so much for the people of hawaii and our nation. it is now up to us to carry on that work. to realize his vision, to draw upon his strength. his strength of purpose and strength of character to do what is right. i know the people of hawaii join me today in pledging to do just that. aloha, senator inouye. mr. speaker, i also ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include ex train youse
6:28pm
material on h.res. 389. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. hirono: i yield to my colleague from the northern mirian as. mr. sablan: mr. speaker, i would like to express my deepest condolences to the people of hawaii for their loss to a great senator and great american. i would not be here today standing in the well of the house if not for senator daniel k. inouye. this leader did so much for so many americans for so many people of the pacific as we are hearing tonight. he touched the lives of so many
6:29pm
individuals, including my own life. in 1986, senator inouye gave me the opportunity to work in his office here at the capitol. senator inouye established a program to bring young men and women from the pacific islands to washington to learn about congress and the united states government. we came from american samoa and from the northern mariana islands, my home. what an opportunity senator inouye gave us. what an eye-opening experience to seekonk at work. what an education to watch up close this distinguished man of the senate. gracious, good human our, principled, quiet and when called to defend the forgotten, fierce, fierce and formidable. i was inspired. seeing what an elected official could be, what he could do to
6:30pm
bring justice to this world. i dreamt one day of doing the same. the northern mariana islands didn't have a seat in congress in 1986. that did not happen until 23 years later. but throughout those 23 years, i held that dream deep in my heart, the dream that senator daniel inouye planted that some day i could represent my people as i had seen him represent the people of hawaii and america. that dream didn't always burn brightly and there were times when i did not tend the flames. but when the day came that congress granted a seat to the people of the northern mariana islands, that flamed roared to life. that inspirings that daniel k. inouye instilled in my heart came alive, instilled in me those many years ago. we are all equals in this great
6:31pm
country, as citizens and as individuals and that against all odds, we can overcome poverty, we can overcome prejudice, we can overcome terrible, terrible, terk physical injury and survive stronger than ever. we can survive and prevail if we believe in the inherent decency and goodness of america as senator inouye believed if we are not afraid to dream. and so i am inspired by this man, aided by the opportunity he once gave to me. and tonight, mr. speaker, i stand here in the well of this chamber to say thank you to daniel k. inouye. thank you, senator inouye, for showing me the way here. thank you, sir, for showing what it means to be a true member of congress. thank you and good night.
6:32pm
rest well. we shall always remember you. and i yield back the balance of my time. . . >> i would like to yield such time as he may consume to my good friend from skea, don young. mr. young: the gentleman just gave a presentation, i'd like to thank senator inouye and i made -- played a part in making sure he could give that presentation. senator inouye, the senator from hawaii, actually, the third senator from skea. he was always able to reach across the aisle and solve problems of the noncontiguous
6:33pm
states with my good friend, senator stevens. hand in hand, two veterans, one lost an arm, one that flew 36 meigs over the hump, together they were one, they were brothers. and they said that so many times. brothers in arms. brothers in supporting two noncontiguous states. brothers in solving problems for people across the aisle. i didn't serve with danny. but i knew him well. because he was the friend of my people. alaska natives. in fact, we had him last year, or two years ago, up to the a.f.m. convention sneesk needs and necessities of the hawaiian natives and recognizing the alaskan natives. he was an icon, a person who
6:34pm
could work together a young man that was japanese, not in an internment camp but volunteered for the america he love. he loved an served an lost but he always won. he always won. but he did that by reaching the one arm he had left in his hand and shaking that hand and saying, let's do it together. let's work together. let's not have the animosity, the rancor, that's occurring today. in fact, when i think about it a moment, i think, you know, danny, god bless you. you're in heaven, hawaii is better off, alaska is better off but if we done change our ways, you'll be terribly disappointed. you will in the be happy ethe way things are happening in this congress including the united states senate.
6:35pm
so danny, i will tell you one thing. you have alaskans, especially my people, my wife, my children, and my grandchildren, that thank you for the efforts you put forth to take the aboriginal people and bring them into the mainstream of life with the help of senator ted stevens system of god bless you, danny. senator for hawaii. and third senator for the state of skea. and i yield back. ms. hanabusa: i yield such time as she may consume to my friend from california, congresswoman matsui. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from california is recognized. ms. matsui: thank you, mr. speaker. i would like to thank my friend the gentlelady from hawaii for
6:36pm
organizing this time for all of taos honor daniel inouye. it's with heavy heart i rise here today in support of this resolution honoring the late senator inouye. on december 17, our country lost a beloved leader, an american hero, and a man i was honored to call my friend. rising to become the most senior member of the united states senate, senator inouye will be remembered not only for his distinguished record as a legislator but also for his heroism on the battlefield. senator inouye serves his country on the battlefields of europe in world war ii and earned the nation's highest honor. the military valor, the medal of honor. as a soldier, senator inouye fought for the lives of american citizens back home to protect his fellow servicemen
6:37pm
and also for the ideals our country stands for. equality. justice. and freedom. when he joined politics, the only thing that changed was his battlefield. senator inouye was a giant in congress. he demonstrated his strong love for his country and belief in the american ideals with every action he took. he was a man who stood by his conviction and fought for what he believed and was never afraid to reach across the aisle and look for bipartisan solution to some of our nation's most pressing problems. and while his presence was certainly strongly felt here in the capitol, he remained accessible to and loved, not only by his constituents in hawaii, but across this country. when i put the word out to my
6:38pm
california constituents that senator inouye had passed away, that congress had lost one of its greatest leaders, i received an outpouring of comments. from my constituents expressing their sorrow and sharing stories of ways that senator inouye had touched their lives. even in my district of sacramento, california, senator inouye was well known, well respected, and well loved. as the highest serving asian american in our country's history, senator inouye was a true inspiration to asian american community. as a member of congress, my late husband, bob matsui, worked closely with senator inouye on the movement for japanese american redress and reparations. together with colleagues, they helped secure a formal government apology for innocent
6:39pm
japanese americans who were victims of one of our country's darkest moments. it would be impossible to find a stronger voice for our nation's veterans than senator inouye. he was instrumental in getting the congressional gold medal awarded to several military units from world war ii, units who were composed almost entirely of persons of japanese ancestry and exhibited exceptional bravery on the battlefield. while their own families were in internment camp here's at home. earlier this year, i worked closely with senator inouye to ensure that the congressional gold medal toured the country so everyone could have the opportunity to learn about the bravery and heroism of these veterans. this is the type of man senator inouye was. he was a man who up to the very end worked tirelessly to bring
6:40pm
recognition to those who deserve it the most. north inouye devoted his life to serving his country. he was an inspiration and role model. a real role model. an example of what every public servant should strive to be. my thoughts and prayers are with his wife irene, his son ken, and their family, especially to his granddaughter maggie who we will make sure hear about the stories of her great grandfather. on a personal level, when my husband passed away, some eight years ago, i recall how generous and sincere danny inouye was toward me and my family during those difficult days. i know this is a difficult time but it is my sincere hope that there is some comfort in knowing that his legacy of
6:41pm
remarkable service and dedication to our country, his love of country, will live on for generations to come. he was truly a giant. i yield back the remainder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentlelady from hawaii is recognized. ms. hanabusa: i yield such time as she may consume to my friend from california, judy hsu. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. sioux: -- ms. hsu: -- ms. hsu: -- ms. chu: earlier we lost one of the greatest congressmen of our times with the passing of senator daniel inouye. he was a true american patriot in every sense of the word. in fact it's hard to think of the state of hawaii without
6:42pm
daniel inouye. since the moment hawaii gained statehood in 1959, he has represented the aloha state in congress and ensured that hawaii and others in the pacific region have access to resources and facilities that many on the continental u.s. take for granted. even though he was labeled an enemy alien during world war ii, he made the decision to enlist in the japanese american go for broke 442nd regiment combat team he fought bravely even as thousands of japanese americans were unjustly placed in internment camps at home. in one terrible bat until italy, he led an assault against a heavily defended ridge. germans shot at him with machine give up derksstroying his right arm. despite that, he was still able to destroy the german bunker.
6:43pm
his bravely earn -- bravery earned him the medal of honor and the congressional gold medal. for that alone, he will always be remembered as a true american hero but senator inouye's service to our country extends far beyond world war ii. he was a trail blaze for the politics when there were few asian americans. he rose through the ranks becoming the chairman of the powerful senate appropriations committee and the president pro tem of the u.s. senate and became our highest rankingation american politician. he broke barriers and paved the way for countless asian american and pacific islanders in public service. in my role as chair of the congressional asian pacific american caucus, i truly valued aze guidance as founder and longtime executive board member of our caucus. he was a tireless advocate for both the people of hawaii and the broader asian american and pacific islander community.
6:44pm
all of us who had the honor to know and learn from him will dearly miss his leadership and the honor and integrity that we need -- that he brought to the job my heart goes out to his wife, irene, and his son, daniel ken inouye jr., and the many family, friends, colleagues and constituents for their tremendous loss. so aloha, senator inouye, thank you for your lifetime of service. while your passing has left us with a great void, we know that your legacy will continue to live on in the many accomplishments you leave behind and in the generations you've inspired through your service to our country. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from hawaii is recognized. ms. hanabusa: i yield such time as she may consume to my friend and colleague from hawaii, --
6:45pm
>> i yield such time as -- to my dear friend, colleen hanabusa. ms. hanabusa: thank you and thank you to my colleague from hawaii for doing this. i rise today in support of the resolution 839 which relates to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of hawaii. i know that as the most senior member of the united states senate, as the appropriations chair, and as a true war hero, senator inouye will be remembered in washington, in hawaii, and across the nation. . tomorrow, he will be given one of the highest honors and that is to lie in state in this capitol. but for me, the passing strikes deeper, because he was also my mentor and a dear friend. i had the honor of having lunch with senator inouye before he
6:46pm
went into the hospital and we discussed many things. know that his love and concern for hawaii and for america has never waivered. he never stopped thinking about how things could be made better, who we could help and we we could accomplish. he was a force to be reckoned with and as i said at the time, i couldn't think of hawaii without senator inouye. since his passing, statements like the congressman from alaska just said about the senator being their third senator has been made by other comments to me as well. so you know his impact was felt very deeply throughout this country. as long as hawaii has been a state, dan inouye served in washington, us, the people of
6:47pm
hawaii. he was always there, as dependable as the sunrise and yet, he was never proud, never acted as though he was better than the people he represented. i can tell you from personal experience that it is just impossible to be an elected official in hawaii without being in awe of daniel k. inouye, someone who served so long and accomplished so much and yet made it seem so effortless. hawaii was and is a grassroots state. you need to get out there with the people, share their activities, eat their food. now that's really critical. laugh at their jokes and there was dan inouye, the war hero, recipient. medal of honor, u.s. senator and i con -- icon in american politics. and he fit right in.
6:48pm
we can spot a phony a mile away, but we loved him because we knew he was the real thing. he was genuine. so here was the most senior member of the senate, chairman of the appropriations committee, president pro tempore and third in line to the succession of the presidency, but in his heart he was no different than that kid growing up in the territorial hawaii, not wearing shoes until he got to high school. who volunteered just out of high school to serve his country in war. and i think that's why when he ran for re-election, his bumper stickers didn't say senator inouye but just said dan. i gist still remember his political poster, solid black
6:49pm
with dan, his signature in yellow. simple, yet strong as he was. i didn't know at that time the significance of the colors, those were the colors of his alma mater, a state he never forgot where he came from. learning from him, that down-to-earth nature was a very special thing. when he shared his insights about serving the people who elected us and doing what is right for hawaii and america, i knew it was coming from his heart. not just that, what he was doing was advising to show the true love for the people he served. but also that he was sharing these insights with me, because he cared enough about me to pass on the lessons.
6:50pm
he genuinely wanted me to do better. quietly, with that great smile and that beautiful voice, he gave that gift of his experience and his wisdom. a man of such accomplishments and power who was unbelievely generous of himself. i will never forget that gift from my friend danny inouye. as we say good-bye to a genuine hero, a champion of hawaii, a political icon, i hope, mr. speaker, you will join us in remembering a wonderful man and to pass this resolution so that we may all say aloha, dan. and thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the lady from hawaii is recognized.
6:51pm
ms. hirono: i yield such time as he may consume to my good friend from california, congressman mike honda. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. honda: thank you, madam chair. i rise with a heavy heart to honor and remember senator inouye. on december 17, 2012, state of hawaii, our nation, pacific asian community lost a polaris, our guiding light and guiding star, senator daniel k. inouye. i'm deeply satened who has been a hero to us all. from his service of the battlefields of world war ii, medal of honor. in serving the aloha state of hawaii and rising to become the highest ranking asian pacific
6:52pm
citizen, his impact is immeasurable and unparalleled. the senator has had a deep sense and reflected a deep sense of dignity in spite of any kind of situations that may surround him. a quiet calm of strength, even in the battlefields to the halls of congress. we know that during the time of watergate, he was slighted by a racial slur, but he did not exchange one for another. he just reflected his quiet strength and dignity, by not responding at all. the rest of the country did for him. and as he went through the watergate process, he showed that he could serve and deal with justice with an even hand. and with that, he showed that
6:53pm
this country can deal with all kinds of problems that it faces. as chairman of the senate appropriations committee, senator inouye worked across the aisle to ensure the needs of the people of hawaii and the sovereign rights of the hawaii ans and other indigenous people as our friend don young mentioned were priorities of his government. during the 1970's and 1980's, senator inouye played a critical role in making sure that this country understood its behavior towards the japanese americans on the mainland and in hawaii. there was an effort to secure an apology, a recognition of the wrongdoings and also move forward with the idea of republica rations but didn't --
6:54pm
reparations but didn't seem they were making much progress. he said perhaps we need to do a study and a commission to educate and inform the rest of the members of this body to understand what it is what we are fighting for. and so came about the world war ii commission on internment. and to the commission study and their gathering of information across this country and listening to people who were aged to the people who were younger, securing information validating the position of those seeking an apology from this government came the conclusion in the final decision to move forward with a bill, 442, to rescind executive order 9044 and make sure that this country
6:55pm
understood the reasons for the incarceration and internment of japanese americans in this country during 1942. the conclusion on that commission reflected the wisdom of senator inouye. the conclusion of the commission said the reason why internment happened to americans of japanese descent was because of war hysteria, racial prejudice and the failure, failure of political leadership. and to that, it's a reminder for me when i listen to him and i watch him work, that he will never ever allow the lack of political leadership in this country to ever fall, not on his watch. since 1959 when i graduated from high school, i reflected back now today of how young he was then and how he stood his ground and guided alaska and his state
6:56pm
to his life in public service. and so, senator inouye proved to be a very devoted husband and a father. and i send my sincerest condolences to the inouye family. his passing may mark the end of an era, but i would declare and say that his work will continue to impact this country in terms of a continuous attention to the rights of all people, including indigenous folks. he once stated in fighting to protect the filipino world war ii veterans. he said heroes should never be forgotten or ignored and he always made sure that those who served their country were not to be forgotten or ignored. we as a grateful nation will
6:57pm
never ever forget the senator from hawaii, the war hero, a servant through his military service, a servant for the halls of congress. and so i say to him aloha. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlelady from hawaii is recognized. ms. hirono: i want to thank all of my colleagues who came to the floor tonight tore share their experiences and thoughts about senator inouye and my other colleagues who express their condolences to his wife, his son ken and daughter in law, his granddaughter maggie. and all those who have expressed and shared their experiences with senator inouye. this is a man who touched so many lives, not just in hawaii, but all across the country. and we all know at this point
6:58pm
what a great senator he was and all of the good works that he did, but at a time like this, we often hear from just individuals who want to share their very human stories about individual kindnesses that he showed. one of my colleagues said today, did you know i was at a function where it was rainy and he held an umbrellas over my head with his one good arm for an hour and how he cared for patients and he invited them to oahu to meet with transportation secretary ray lahood so the secretary could hear from these residents who didn't get to travel very much and could share with the secretary their own concerns and to ask for his help and they were helped. so it is always a human dimension to what senator inouye
6:59pm
did and it struck me and he did so in a very quiet way. so we honor him. we thank him. and his last words before he passed on was aloha. and senator, we bid aloha. we love you. aloha. mr. speaker, i yield back, the reminder of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. without objection, the previous question is ordered. without objection, the resolution is adopted and the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts rise? mr. markey: mr. speaker, i have a special order. the speaker pro tempore: the house lays before the house the following personal requests.
7:00pm
the clerk: leaves of absence requested for mr. mica of florida after 5:00 p.m. today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the request is granted. are there requests for one-minute speechs? under the speaker's announced spoifl january 5, 2011, the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. markey, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. markey: thank you, mr. chairman. i rise this evening to honor two great members of the massachusetts delegation who are departing. the first, john olver. john olver is a public service power house.
7:01pm
a transportation titan. inside of this institution. he has a ph.d. in science but as he came to this institution, he became a scientist who became a statesman. we were honored to have him in our delegation, in this chamber. he was an avid outdoorsman, but he was ahead of his time in bringing attention to the impact of climate change, the need to protect our natural environment, the need to raise science as it affected the planet to this chamber for our consideration. he arrived in congress in 1991. his service on the appropriations committee helped rebuild our country's infrastructure and resulting in
7:02pm
critical investments in transportation. but at the same time, always, he was an incredible advocate for his constituents, for their industries, and for the way of life of western massachusetts. he was a very special member of this institution. he began his career in the massachusetts state legislature. he has dedicated the largest portion of his life to serving the public, to serving ordinary citizens. and he is going to be sorely missed. he made a huge difference in the lives of the people of massachusetts and our country. and i just want to say that from our entire delegation, but from the entire congress, that he is definitely going to be
7:03pm
someone who is irreplaceable in this institution. at this point, i would like to reserve the balance of my time and to recognize the gentleman from western massachusetts, mr. neal. mr. neal: mr. speaker, i want to thank mr. markey for his -- for allow noge participate in this special order tonight and to speak on two very valued members of the massachusetts congressional delegation and to speak of two members who have had a profund influence on not just the politics of massachusetts but the important policies of massachusetts. some years ago, george w. bush, president bush, said to me at a st. patrick's day luncheon, starting out with some humor, he said, hey, rich, how am i doing in massachusetts? and i said, mr. president, i
7:04pm
don't think you're doing that great in massachusetts right now. with some laughter. and he said to me new york a very candid observation, he said, i want to tell you something. i always like running against you guys from massachusetts and tangling with you guys from massachusetts, he said, because i always felt i was matching up against the best in america. i thought that was pretty interesting for a conservative president to talk about the massachusetts congressional delegation. and i think that the two members who are departing from this delegation are part of the high skill of two very good legislators. that's a skill that is not today held in the regard that it once was. the zhoifl really good ledge slayor. individuals who painstakingly know where the commas have to go, know when paragraphs have to end. and to make sure that sentences
7:05pm
don't run on so that the intention of the legislation is honored. so we all cheer on the final product but many people dislike having to view the process that gets us there. now, in the case of congressman frank, he always had this reputation for being the great and universal outsider in politics. but his success came from the fact that he mastered the skill of the insider in this institution. he knew when enough was enough an it was the best deal you were going to get. after he made full advocacy for the plan he offered and desired, he also knew that you need 218 votes or in his committee, he wanted to put the face of bipartisanship on the actual bill. republican legislators in this institution, members of the
7:06pm
banking committee, would always say to me, jeeze, barney frank is one capable guy. because he was looking for the compromise as the fath forward. so you could talk to him about the complications of capital ratios, you can talk to him about the federal reserve board, you could talk to him about world issues. but at the same time, the unfailingly made it home to march in all of those parades, to attend functions for people who had been with him in elected office for four decades, to make the phone calls you have to make. he understood once again that in this institution the opinions of america and the emotions of america play out. sometimes you get a good deal, an other days you don't get the deal you wanted. before anybody in public life
7:07pm
was advocating for gay rights, barney frank was in the forefront. he was in the forefront on women's rights and he was a great scholar, student, an participant in the civil rights struggle of our time. both of these legislators are also interestingly enough but in my mind, principled individuals. children of the new deal. who believed that government plays a positive role in the lives of the american family. not because government draws a conclusion on where we end up, necessarily, in life but they both believe fervently in the idea that government ensured that everybody could get to the starting line for the race. now in the case of john olver, ray lahood said to me one night at dinner, and he's been a fast friend, for those of us interested in transportation in western massachusetts and indeed central massachusetts,
7:08pm
ray lahood said to me, you know, john olver is one smart guy. and he said, the meetings in his office can go on for a long time. but he said, i've got to tell you, he really understands transportation theory. and he understands transportation implementation. couple of great things we were able to participate in because in western massachusetts we always use the argument that people don't pay enough attention to our part of the state, but it was a small -- but it was small things like extending broadband access into the hilltowns of western massachusetts. improving rail transportation from new haven, to springfield, and on to vermont. in the case of john olver, very help to feel me when i asked him in the transportation legislation to make sure that my congressional district and constituency were able to
7:09pm
secure the funding that we desired. that's an important part of the legislators' life. i also think that what was interesting about john and barney, they're believers. in a time when the public often says the elected embrace superficial positions only to seek and curry the favor of the public, one of the two important things about these two guys, they were happy to tell you they disagreed with you. in fact, as the two of them got older, they were enthusiastic about telling you they disagreed with you. oftentimes, when you walk into a room, where the audience might be one that only wants you to say what they want you to say, these two would go into the room and say what they thought was on their minds. conclusions that they had drawn after long service in this
7:10pm
institution and in the massachusetts legislature. but i also will tell you, based upon the point i raised at the begin moifing comments, we need to return in this institution -- we need a return in this institution to the skill of the legislator. it's the same skill that the jeweler looks at a diamond with. it's the same ambition that takes people to pulitzer prizes. it's the athlete in the gym who spends their time preparing for the olympics. we need to honor that skill because it's often outside of the glare of the public and when the public does see it, they're uncomfortable with it. but it's the give and take of legislative life that made these two very good to work with. i'll say this about the two of them as well they may not like it, there were times when we needed something that they might not quite have been in
7:11pm
agreement with and after you got a little bit of their irritation, they generally included what it was that you wanted. it was an honor to serve with them and i hope we haven't heard the last of either john olver or barney frank. they've been very important to this institution and to america. mr. markey: i thank the gentleman so much. now i would like to recognize the gentleman from massachusetts, mike capuano. mr capuano: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i generally don't do a whole lot of work on this stuff but i've known these gentlemen a long timism met them both in 1976 when i was in law school and had the good fortune of getting a work study job at the state house. they were both there already, already well recognized and influential at the state house. i will tell you from the day i met them, i started learning from both of them.
7:12pm
. to be very clear. i want to echo everything mr. neal said, i hold public service in high regard and know that everybody in the massachusetts delegation does as well. these two gentlemen not only served in congress, they served at the state level and were both educators. they didn't do this because that's what they could do. one has a ph.d. from m.i.t. the every has -- the other has a law degree from harvard. either one of them could have done anything they wanted to do, and been well compensated doing it. had a much more comfortable life never having read their names in the newspapers as bad people on different occasions. the fact that they gave of themselves right from the beginning, they didn't go out and make $1 million and then come in, right from the beginning, as young men, i think it's an amazing thing. for those of us who have done
7:13pm
-- who followed a similar path, the first several years of doing public service new york matter what you're doing, are not lucrative. it's usually a difficult struggle. to stick to it for as long as they did, between the two of them if you add up the years not just in elected office because elected office is only one way to give back to the public but add back the years they served as staff members or teachers you add that together, combined, we're talking 100 years, guys. i'm sorry. between the two of you, it's 100 years of public service to the commonwealth of massachusetts. that's something that's amazing. they said -- i said i met them both at the state house and didn't stop. i moved beyond the state house, john was still there, barney has moved to congress, i kept learning from them. then when i came to congress. in my job at the state house, i went on to become a full-time
7:14pm
employee, you know it, but most people listening don't know it. most of the committees in massachusetts, most are joint committees, house and senate. i was on a joint committee payroll but everybody knew i worked for the house. john happened on the senate chairman of the committee i worked for. since massachusetts is such an overwhelmingly democratic state, my job was really to do everything i could to stick toyota john olver on behalf of the house, to get everything we wanted and not what he wanted. and really, those fights were nothing more than the epitome of family fights, nothing compared to the fight we was here based on deep philosophical differences of opinion. but even then, i loved working with john. because as ritchie said, i remember once, we traveled in the state arguing against limitations of local rights. john went on for about 20, 30 minutes at some hearing, about the evils of this particular
7:15pm
proposition, and he broke, kind of getting tired, john said i'm awfully sorry, i'm running on about this issue but i'm a college professor, i think in 50-minute blocks. and he went right back in and did the other 20 minutes. i don't know if he convinced anybody but he made me laugh for the whole time because he knew who he was. he knew what he was. and he knew the subject. when i get to congress, my first assignment per one of my many friends and mentors, financial services. barney was already there. i can't tell you how much i learned from him. we shared a philosophical view, as most of the delegation does. housing is a passion of mine, as it was with barney. it became really incrediblely -- incredibly easy for me, i was able to kind of step back on the details of a lot of the major housing policy because
7:16pm
barney was such a champion and i was able to focus on some of the holes i saw in some of the policies that maybe some other members of congress don't see. that's true about many, many things. barney just carried that bill like you wouldn't believe. it allowed me the opportunity to not worry about the big stuff because barney was going to take care of it. i got to focus on some of the smaller details that we got engaged in. i learned so much from him as a member of the financial services committee. i hope i can be 1/10 as successful as you have been, barney, in bringing people together, but not forgetting who and what we are and who and what we believe in. john by that time was already the cardinal of the subcommittee appropriations and it's true. i thought i knew a fair amount about transportation. i'm one of those guys who thinks, don't tell me about my district, nobody knows my district better than i do.
7:17pm
i know the needs, i work with them, that's one of the reasons i'm such a vocal and public proponent of earmarks, because no one knows my congressional district better than i do. except when it came to transportation matters, except john ol measure. i got to tell you, john, it made ming an ray couple of times when you came up and told me things about my district, that you were right. that i hadn't realized it. like, oh, jeez. got me again. i can't tell you how many times i've worked with him to try to improve transportation policy for my district, but in turn for the commonwealth. and in turn for the country. and i just wanted to come up tonight to thank both of you for your service on behalf of the general public. but also as a personal matter. both of you have been guiding lights for me. i have learned a lot from both of you. different approaches, similar philosophies, different
7:18pm
personalities, different attitudes and i'm a little different than both of you on some things, but i'm alike on some things as well. i will tell you that as a life-long resident of massachusetts, i'm proud that you served us, i'm proud that i had the opportunity to work with you, before congress, in congress, and i will tell that you i'm proud to call you both a colleague and a friend. thank you very much. mr. markey: i thank the gentleman for his comments and i turn to recognize the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. keating. mr. keating: thank you, meem. i thank my colleague for yielding -- mr. speaker. and i thank my colleague for yielding. you know, i had the privilege of serving with these two gentlemen not only in congress but in the massachusetts legislature. i remember being elected and serving at the age of 24 and my seat would be right in front of barney frank's seat in the legislature at the time. now, at that time we had 240
7:19pm
legislators, very few people had legislative aides. it was truly -- you were on your own. you were your own speech writer, you were your own researcher. did you your own negotiations and to have barney frank behind me in the give and take of everything, when there were issues on the floor and we were talking, was amazing. i can't even tell you what i learned about being a lawmaker, a legislator, putting deals together and negotiating. and we also worked in the legislative study group at the time. and i learned an important lesson that sadly is not utilized at the state and local levels these days houfment to work in coalitions, effectively. because a lot of us are progressives and the legislature at the time wasn't particularly noted for that. and we would know if we worked together, and i learned from people like barney that if you work together they're going to need your vote sometime. and we could work together as a group and be effective.
7:20pm
and learned at that stage that you can be effective at any level of the legislature, if you become skilled and you become tenacious. and he inherited this. i had the good fortune of also getting to know his mother. she was very active in the association of older, elder americans, and she was terrific. she was passionate, knowledgeable, effective and i can see where he got a lot of his skills. but one of the things that impressed me also was the fact that his time working as the chief executive for the late mayor, and he had the opportunity to really be there at the executive level. and i could see that reflected in his legislating. and i can see it today. because he knew from the legislative side how important it was to do things to empower people on the executive side and how they could work in tandem. and i know he took from that experience the fact there are no
7:21pm
sacred cows. when you're in that position in a big city and you're doing things you have to do, you're not always taking the most popular stance but you're taking stuff stances against different groups. and he had no sacred cows and he was willing to speak up when necessary. and i think people in this chamber know as well that when he took the floor then, just like he takes the floor now, you want to be the person on the -- you don't want to be the person on the other side of that debating. but even in the incident of a noisy house, something that is similar to both branches, when he would get up everyone would get quiet. they wanted to listen. they were really interested in the intellectual and the humorous sides of the debate that they were about to see. during that time as well we would have our votes up on the board. and i can tell you this. at a time when -- in the distinct minority -- when you
7:22pm
were in the distinct minority on the issues of gender right, discrimination, discrimination against some sexual orientation, on issues of basic fairness, those lights were always on the right side, whether in the majority, the winning side, or the losing side. time has changed, these decades have changed how the public feels about many of these positions. and now they're popular. but at that time they weren't. but he was resolute. you know, i also look back at some of the differences during that period of time. back then barney would have probably no time to shine his shoes or he'd have holes in his shoes, maybe his suit looked like it hadn't seen the cleaners ever. but i remember his campaign slogan at the time, it said, neatness isn't everything. vote for barney frank. and i've seen an amazing transformation now that i'm going to have the privilege
7:23pm
either to represent the city of new bedford, barney in taylor -- tailor-made suits and i saw that transformation as well. but i've got some big shoes to fill down there. he's beloved in that area. as much as he's dealing with the intricacies of something like dodd-frank, many of the other things he's done representing sidious issues, he is by far the most popular elected official that the fishermen in the new bedford area and southeastern massachusetts area have ever seen. his loyalty to them is probably only eclipsed by their loyalty to him. and he understood, he knows so much about fish. i don't know if i'll ever catch up or ever have the opportunity. but it's amazing how complex that issue is as well. but i would say this. of all the things, all the
7:24pm
actions he's taken in his time in public life, one of his most proudest actions would be, not just what people would think is working on dodd-frank, but i think it was really his marriage to jim and he's told me how important that was, to do while he was a member of congress. again, showing leadership by action. on an issue. and i was just so happy to be at that wedding and to see that union, that marriage. and i was very pleased to see the happiness and the love that was there at that time. my only regret is that his mother wasn't there to see it as well. because she would have been so proud. one thing you'll never say about barney frank or john olver, i don't think there was ever a tv ad, an attack ad that had one of those weather vein issues, you
7:25pm
know, where you change a position on this and you change your position on something else, on an important issue. they were both resolute. and hit opportunity to serve with john -- and i had the opportunity to serve with john briefly in the senate in massachusettsment and interestingly enough, when he was chairman of taxation in the senate, i was his successor as chairman of taxation in the massachusetts senate. and when i had that position i started going through the reports and the research documents and i knew that they just weren't done by researchers . that they had his thumbprints and his intellectual abilities all over them. i must tell you, if i started going through those things back a few decades ago, i probably wouldn't be through them now. i remember on the floor of the house, when john would be carrying a bill to the floor, how people didn't really question anything he had to say, but it's interesting enough, when you go in for questions, i
7:26pm
seldom saw people go up to john with questions on that legislation because all of us didn't want to know that much about whatever he was talking about. but john had that same sense, strong sense of fairness, of protect your civil rights, a protector of equality, and one of the leaders at our time on understanding about the importance of the environment and the way we treat it. he was a champion for western massachusetts. not just with the infrastructure that's there, but when you thought of our colleges out there and the kind of infrastructure that gives people the opportunity for a good life and to advance in life, john olver's fingerprints were all over that. he took that same attention to detail he had in the mass legislation -- legislature and used it in appropriations with great effect. john and barny, i wish them both
7:27pm
well. they deserve it and they will continue to be productive, helping our state and helping the people in our state in other capacities. and with that i will yield back the balance of my time. mr. markey: i thank the gentleman. and i now yield to the gentleman from massachusetts, mr. tierney. mr. tierney: i thank the gentleman, mr. markey, for recognizing me at this point in time for the special order. you know, we did a little research, so we wouldn't stand up here, because i know both john and barney are sticklers for detail. so a little research, found a special order of some time ago when barney frank, congressman frank, came down to the floor basically to chastise one of the colleagues who had made a false claim during their special order. but what barney had to say at that point and i quote is, special orders are a time when members can fairly, freely say things without fear of contradiction because there's generally no one there.
7:28pm
as you listen to many of the special orders, there's a very good reason why no one is here. no one ought to want to pay attention to them, closed quote. well, barney and john, today people ought to pay attention to what we're saying at this particular special order because you have both served the commonwealth of massachusetts and the united states for a long period of time ably and in way that nobody should forget and everybody should want to talk and recount. a lot of years between the two of you over here. john, 40 years in total. 20 of them, over 20 of them here in the united states house of representatives. but i remember knowing you well before you knew me. back when john olver was a senator in the state of massachusetts, as a young student at the time i had the responsibility of janitorial services and cleaning up that state house and i can remember going into his office, he was always busy, always had people in there, still working late into the night. we were going around emptying barrels and vacuuming rugs and he was always generous and kind to us at that time. i noted how busy he always was
7:29pm
getting detail and that never changed. when i later in the opportunity to come here to the house of representatives and be a colleague of john's, just as others have recounted before me, he's meticulous in his detail, knowledgeable about every subject on which he spoke or acted and he had so much -- it would be unfair over 20 years to say that john olver had a specialty in just one area. because like every member, you have to know a lot about a lot of different subjects and work very well with your staff to make sure that you have all the information that you need. an john was a leader and knowledgeable in a number of different arealess. what he did for his part of the state will not be forgotten any time soon by people there. whether it's getting designated a national heritage area for his region and so much more. but we will remember for the work that he did particularly with appropriations on transportation matters. my district will remember john for the work he did because, as richie noted and bill before me, you oftentimes knew exactly what your district needed and he knew
7:30pm
how to help you get it. i can go to various parts of my district now, john, and see projects that are there because of your help, because of your knowledge of what went on and your focus and persistence in making sure that they were funded. most recently was the city of ayesberry which opened up a transportation center which also houses its veterans office and its council on aging. i memmingsed the work you had done in helping us do that. they are all incredibly grateful, as are so many people throughout my district and the district of our colleagues here, for the work you did and the time you spent on our districts' need asal -- as well as taking care of your district's needs. i want to share the appreciation of all the people in my district. up until a few weeks ago, barney's office was right around the corner from mine. he wondered what they were doing up here taking up his
7:31pm
time when he was working on the dodd-frank bill, so they'd all wander into my office but the fact of the matter is, barney was always intensely involved with the matters he was involved with here. he said when he was talking about one of our beloved former colleagues, joe smoke lee, he said what was true about joe is also true about him he said smoke lee was a great stereotype breaker. barney, you have been a great stereotype breaker as well. in so many areas, it's countless on that. you said one of the things we suffer from is the assumption that if you're a, we cannot be b, and if we're x, we cannot be y. you said joe showed us how that could be, and you've done the same. barney was one of the fiercest debaters here. before i got to congress, i
7:32pm
watched if he was on the floor and i saw other speakers engage him in colloquy wince because if they misspoke, they would get what they deserved. you've been one of the most intense members, and i say that in a good way, but always pragmatic enough to know the art of the deal. ritchie spoke to that, he knew when he discussed things on the floor here, it's porn in this legislative body to not be so ideologically extreme that you cannot make a koch mies, not on your principles but other matters so we can get the business of the house done. barney frank and john olver always had that in mind. always knew how to drive to a bargain that would represent all their values, make sure they were compromising their principles but make sure that the business of this country and the things important in their district and their state got done. both of you deserve a great deal of credit and we can only hope that this house finds its way back to those days when a majority of this body finds all
7:33pm
that necessary and possible to do. on a personal note, as bill mentioned, patrice and i were thrilled when barney and jim got married, another way of showing you can be a leader in times. i just recently saw a program on a sheryl wright, a country an western singer, she went through how difficult it was for her to come out. i was moved by that show, it reminded me of what it must have been for barney or anybody else in public life to have to come out not knowing what the reaction of your own family or friends or colleagues or anybody in public is going to think about that and take the risk to do it. and that is certainly one thing that this body and this country will always remember. whether it's our fishermen, the gay and lesbian community, are going to remember barney frank for all they did and they'll remember john olver.
7:34pm
we wish you the best in your future, john, i know you'll keep busy, you and rose, and barney, i know you'll keep busy too, but i hope you come to dipper with us. one nice thing about barney, he was good about telling patrice, you can make what you made last time, that's fine but yim and i won't be cooking. i yield back. mr. markey: i thank the gentleman from salem and recognize the gentlelady from lowell. >> thank you, mr. markey. it's great to be here, although a said moment as well because we are losing not truly lose bug no longer serving on a daily basis with two remarkable colleagues with whom it has been my privilege to serve for five years. their -- they're distinguished legislators as we're hearing but they're also great friends.
7:35pm
ms. tsongas: barney frank has been a family friend for many years. my sister-in-law was barney's press secretary in his first race for congress. and i was so proud to receive his support when i first sought this seat five years ago. he commented at the time that he was responsible for defeating the last woman who had served for massachusetts, and he wanted to help elect the next woman who was seeking to serve for massachusetts. it had been 25 years. and barney, as we've heard, has been a legend in everything he's done. i watched him from afar. i e young when he was working with kevin white. we knew who he was because even at that young age, he was very colorful and very able and recognized as being so extraordinarily bright. and always witty. as a state legislator as well, in here, we see it and heard about it over and over again.
7:36pm
soon after getting here five years ago, maybe a little -- a year into it, we struggled with the collapse of wall street. and i remember thinking that we were so fortunate to have barney frank in a place where his expertise, his commitment to learning, brought such great value to what we sought to do in order to stop the free fall while protecting american citizens and the american economy. and it really was a moment where one was reminded that as much as we talk about term limits, and the need to be reinvigorated and bring new people in, there is tremendous value in people who have been here a while who have mastered the material and who know quickly thousand respond in an emergency, which at that -- which that moment most certainly was. it's something i take with me, that we need to have a balance. we were fortunate to have barney frank in the position as chairman of financial services
7:37pm
as he was at that moment. and we've heard and cannot -- will never forget the tremendous work he has done on civil rights and gender equality. i often think as we come to washington and we seek to make a difference, we're like a little feather in a stream, we can make a little difference here and there. but barney frank has improved lives of millions of americans across this country. with his work on gender equality. and again, i will never forget as the employment nondiscrimination act passed this house, for the first time, did not go anywhere in the senate but a remarkable testament to barney's committed and extraordinary personal courage as he has fought for these issues for so many years. and i have to congratulate him on falling in love with and marrying a gentleman from my district, jim reddy, it's been a wonderful thing but i think
7:38pm
the best thing of all is he came from tewkesbury, massachusetts. it's now john's district. and john olver, i think of john as a gentleman of the house. he's thoughtful, so knowledge nl, -- so knowledgeable, so quiet, but so committed and i've been happy to inherit a certain part of his district, although i know that his constituents there will miss him forever and i think as an example of how generous a man he is, how hard he worked as we made our way into these new communities, how hard he worked for me and congressman mcgovern to make sure that we were introduced in a way that positioned us well to move on and become representatives of those communities. i'm happy to inherit them but again, i know i have such big shoes to fill. and i see it in particular in all his work, he has been the cardinal on the transportation side of the appropriations
7:39pm
committee, the tremendous work he's done to bring resources to some communities that really will benefit from them but it is not just about the resources, the fitchburg rail line is not just about a rail line, it is about the future of a community connecting the central part of massachusetts into the boston area, improving the lives, the economic opportunities of the people who live and work there. so again, a remarkable legislator who i know i will misand i went to an event that was mosted -- hosted by his many, many staff members. he was beloved by his staff. and in also attend wrg a number of people who over the years had made their way into john's office to talk about some particular funding that they were seeking and across the board, everyone said wow howe well prepared they had to be because invariably he knew more than they knew and would have a
7:40pm
question for them that they could not answer. i have to say, i had the very same experience with him as i made my way into his office. so remarkable legislators, people who have done so much good for our country, so much good for our commonwealth, who do so much for those who wonder, really, about the quality of those of us who serve here, i think we can only be proud and they have only elevated the stature of this most remarkable institution and the -- that which we all seek which is to be a member of congress and do so in a way that is intelligent, with great integrity, none of us will have the wit, though, of barney frank. mr. markey: i thank the gentlelady and yield to the gentleman from worcester, mr. mcgovern. mr. mcgovern: i thank the dean of the delegation for yielding me the time. let me say it is a real
7:41pm
privilege to serve in the massachusetts delegation. i think some of the most colorful and effective political personalities have come from massachusetts. and i'm proud to be part of this delegation. but i'm particularly proud to be part of a delegation that includes john olver and barney frank. my new district includes many of the towns and cities that john olver has represented over the years. as i've got ton know these communities i've got ton realize how much love the people of these cities and towns have for john olver, how much they appreciate his incredible work. i have also come to appreciate all that he has done, transportation infrastructure projects, new quality, affordable housing. protection of open space, day care centers, support for colleges and universities, and i could go on and on and on.
7:42pm
as niki pointed out his intellect is unequaled, and sometimes it's intimidating. i'm afraid to ask john olver a question because i don't want to know that much. but nonetheless, there's nobody who knows more detail about every single project in every single community in his district than john olver. john is a quiet man but he's a determined man. someone with deep, strong, convictions. someone with a spine of steel he cares about people halfway down the block and he cares about people halfway around the world. i have the unique experience of engaging in civil disobedience with john not once, but twice. protesting the genocide in darfur and we shared time in a cell two times together. a lot of people don't expect john to be involved in that type of protest but he was there he was there because he
7:43pm
thought it was important and he thought it was important that the world know that people are watching. -- are watching what was happening in darfur and sudan. he's thought me a lot and i value his friendship very much and i'm going to be his new congressman so i expect i will hear from him on a regular basis. as for barney, i will miss him like everyone here very, very much. when i was an aide to joe smoke lee in the early 1980's, no matter who joe moakley was speaking with, he'd have the tv on watching the proceedings on c-span. when barney came to the floor, he'd tell everybody to shut up, be quiet, listen, this is boing to be good. he would increase the volume an everybody would watch barney frank in action. there is no one i enjoy, there's no one i think most of my colleagues enjoy seeing debate on the floor more than barney frank and i would say that there's probably no one
7:44pm
the republicans fear more in debate than barney frank. he has the ability to be able to make the most important points but also maintain a sense of humor. and it has made him one of the reasons why he's been so effective. i've had me good fortune of sharing communities with barney over the years. we represented city of fall river together. and i think it's important for people to know that in addition to being this national leader, barney frank is also a very effective bread and butter, nuts and bolts politician who cared very, very deeply about every single issue that occurred in his district, whether it was, you know, an economic development initiative, whether it was a bridge or a road, whether it was you know, helping a veteran get his medals from world war ii or helping mrs. o'leery find her lost social security check or becoming the champion of
7:45pm
fishermen on the east coast. he immersed himself in these issues and he was unbelievably powerful spokesperson for all these issues. but barney is not only in my opinion a great member of congress, he's also a very, very good man. look at the causes that he has championed. we've heard about his efforts on behalf of lgbt rights. civil rights. human rights. affordable housing. you know, a voice for working families. reining in the excesses of these financial institutions on wall street. but for me, what i have admired about him is that he has been a steadfast and unequaled voice on behalf of poor people in this country. and i regret very much that so much of what goes on here in washington neglects paying
7:46pm
attention to the very least among us and barney has been out there even though it's unfashionable talking about the need for affordable housing for people who are poor, making sure that people have enough to eat, making sure that people get what they need so they can vladders of opportunity to succeed. and i'm going to miss his voice on those issues in particular. because to me it's so important. i happen to believe if government stands for anything, it ought to stand for the most vulnerable and -- in this country system of barney, thank you. and one other thing my mother wants you to run for senate. she told you that in the airport, she wanted me to tell you that again. but i close by saying it is with great affection and love and friendship and so much respect that i stand here tonight to pay tribute to two people who i think are giants in this institution, john olver and barney frank.
7:47pm
i thank the dean for yielding me the time and i yield back. mr. markey: i thank the gentleman and i yield such time as she may consume to the leader of the democratic party, the gentlelady from san francisco, ms. pelosi. ms. pelosi: i thank the gentleman for yielding. tonight we come to the floor to pay tribute to two people, barney frank and john olver, who in many ways could not be more different. they are the same in this respect, they have made both of them important marks on the congress of the united states. what's special about them is that they are so different but in their shared values, in their effectiveness, on their knowledge of the issues and their ability to persuade our colleagues to join them in a vote, they share that talent. especially those values representing massachusetts in the congress. i had the privilege of serving
7:48pm
with john olver on the appropriations committee. so i saw firsthand and very close up his extraordinary mastery of the facts of the substance before us and his political astuteness to find a way to get the job done as the chairman and ranking member of an important subcommittee of appropriations, transportation. he -- better known as h.u.d. he and -- he's a cardinal, a cardinal. that's what they call them. cardinals on that committee. so as a cardinal he commanded a great deal of respect by our colleagues. that came easily to us because as i say, we knew him well, his values and his judgment. i want to point out one thing in particular and that is he always had an interest in promoting or empowering women, whether it was in the congress or in the
7:49pm
country or in the world. some early conversations i had with him about human rights violations against women, against anyone, but his concern was deep and knowledgeable. in congress he was supportive of advancing women into positions of power here. i can speak of that firsthand. and also for women in the country. his wife is an academic, as he is, i guess you still are, having served in the congress all this time, you can still be considered that, an intellectual. and again he always knew of what he spoke and brought great passion, judgment and deliberation -- deliberativeness, is that a word? he was very deliberative in getting a job done. so it was an honor to call him colleague. he brought a special contribution to the congress.
7:50pm
thank you, congressman john olver, for your leadership, for your friendship. and again sitting there next to barney frank, who is a phenomenon, a force of nature, something -- somebody very special to all of us. unique in terms of his incredible intellect and in some people's opinion, great humor. his and mine for two. to serve with him was really an experience and we learned from him not only every time he spoke, because he spoke with such wisdom and knowledge of the subject, but also we learned from him and how to get his attention, hold it, but not too long, and move on with whatever idea we had in mind. i had the occasion when i came to congress the first time to call barney and say, i'm so
7:51pm
offended by what is going on on the floor. they're saying terrible things about people there who are in need and it went on and on and on and i got to the end of it and he said, why are you calling me? i said, well, i want to know what are we going to do about that? he said, well, what are you going to do about it? and next time you call me, just get right to the point right from the start. well, that was very good advice and now when i speak i say, barney, subject, problem, action needed, timing. now we've gotten along great for decades. he really didn't -- as one of my friends john burton would say, he just wanted to know if you enjoyed the movie, he didn't want to know if you had butter on your popcorn. spare me the extra information that is not needed by him. ok. so i first met him when i went to -- i first met him -- i first
7:52pm
basked in his aura at the banking committee where he was a leader on the housing subcommittee. we had that in common, representing boston and san francisco, two cities with a high cost of housing and knowing that we had to meet the needs of people who could not afford that high cost. and so that respect for people's need to have the dignity of a home no matter what their economic situation was was again his commitment, as others have mentioned, to those at the lower scale -- lower place on the economic scale. so housing, affordability of it, the stock of it, the housing opportunities for people with h.i.v. and aids, all of those kinds of issues. as you can imagine, he had the full view of it all and a way to get the job done. a discrimination, everybody has talked about it this evening, but it's a very transforming
7:53pm
thing, transformative thing to see barney frank talk about discrimination, how it affected him, could have affected him in his life. and how he didn't want that risk to be taken by other young people who might have had some questions about their sexual assault and the rest. i remember when we were doing the bill on the hate crimes bill, fully inclusive hate crime bill, it was really a very important bill that some people would have to take a political risk to work for in their districts. and barney came to the caucus and spoke about it. he said, i'm the chairman of the financial services committee. important leaders of the financial community beat a path to my door, they want to hear what i think on subjects and tell me what they think. but i wasn't always the chairman of the financial services committee. i was once a 16-year-old boy who
7:54pm
had questions and i identify with those little boys now, those young people now and that's why this is important. it was following the matthew shepherd murder and all that that implied. but for him to have the generosity of spirit to share his inner most thoughts about his own life and how that instructed him to act, it was almost a moral imperative for him to act. he had a special responsibility because of his own personal experience to act. and members just responded to him. he spoke to them in a very personal way. they responded to him in a very personal way and we passed something very, very important for our country to end discrimination. i remember when we passed -- the first time we passed an amendment to repeal don't ask don't tell, official my god gosh, it was so exciting, it was so exciting. i went up to barney after the
7:55pm
vote and i said, barney, you're making history today. he said, yes, because we repealed don't skrks don't tell. i said, no, because we did this amendment on the defense authorization bill. i said, no, not because of that. that's history, yes, but we're making history because today you're going to vote for your first defense authorization bill which has funding for the war in iraq and afghanistan. so in any event, knowing that we had a greater good -- a separate issue to deal with and people were waiting to see how congress would act, he of course made history by not only voting for an amendment to repeal don't ask, don't tell, but for the defense authorization bill. and many of like-minded and thinking and voting people who follow barney's lead followed him down that path so that the bill would pass. but it just goes over and over
7:56pm
again, the consumer, protecting the taxpayer, protecting the consumer bill, dodd-frank, of such magnitude and scope, having such important implications for, again, protecting main street. he was masterful, not just because he was protecting the consumer, but because he understood the balance that was necessary in the legislation and that was really a mark of his leadership all along. he always respected the views of all stakeholders and any initiative that was put forth. i see by walking around the deeb of the -- the dean of the massachusetts delegation that time may be short so i will reduce my remarks but i did want to make sure people knew what an important force he was in providing affordable housing in our country, ending discrimination in every possible way i just named, in the fight against h.i.v. and aids and
7:57pm
protecting the consumer and the taxpayer and dodd-frank and i know that any of us who was at his wedding, any of us who were at his wedding and any of us who danced with him at his wedding knows that that was a special privilege indeed. not chaired by many -- shared by many but a compliment indeed. he will be very missed. he'll be missed for his intellect. every time he spoke we learned. his parliamentary prowess. ests a master of parliamentary procedure and -- he was a master of parliamentary procedure and i think rev he willed in playing that role -- reveled in playing that role on the floor of the house. again, always loved his district, proud of his state of massachusetts and really a national figure that will go down in history as one of the greats to have ever served in the house of representatives.
7:58pm
he's given me fashion advice which is interesting getting fashion advice from barney frank. but i value that, if he took the trouble or had the thought to make the point that i should give away a particular article of clothing because -- not known for his sarrer toial splendor, nonetheless he made a point about it, you knew that there was some truth, some truth to whatever view he was ex pounding. so with that i'm honored to join the massachusetts delegation to sing the praises two of great leaders, as they differ in terms of style, that significant, both of them, in their contribution to our country. congressman, otherwise known as chairman john olver, the cardinal from the appropriation it's committee, -- committee, and -- from the appropriations committee, and chairman barney frank. it's an honor to serve with you, a privilege to call you friend. thank you for your service to our country.
7:59pm
with that i yield back. mr. markey: i thank the gentlelady. and i yield myself as much time as may remain in the hour. and i would ask if it was possible for the gentleman from indiana to be able to yield -- mr. burton: madam speaker -- mr. markey: the opening part of his -- mr. burton: the gentleman, the old man or the dean, as they call him, of the massachusetts delegation has asked if we would give him some of our one-hour time and i would like to ask unanimous consent that we give him -- how much time do you need? mr. markey: five. mr. burton: five minutes? an additional five minutes. mr. markey: i thank -- mr. burton: is that all right or is there a problem with that? the speaker te